August

  • Aql - Aquila the Eagle

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    22 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Between Cygnus and Sagittarius, with Altair (its brightest star) making the south end of the Summer Triangle (along with Deneb of Cygnus and Vega of Lyra). As the night sky changes, Aquila the Eagle and Cygnus the Swan swing slowly westward across the sky towards the horizon. The Eagle sets tail first, followed closely by the Swan, who dives beak first below the western horizon.

    Skylore and Literature

  • Aqr - Aquarius the Water Carrier

    Size

    10 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Water jar pattern. Near Pegasus.

    An ancient Babylonian constellation which contained the September equinox in the fourth millenium B.C. Aquarius is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

    M2 (Globular cluster), mag. 6.4.

    M72 (Globular cluster), mag. 9.3.

    M73 (Galactic cluster), mag. 9.1.

     

     

  • Cap - Capricornus the Sea Goat

    Size

    40 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Between Sagittarius and Aquarius. Dim stars; look for laughing mouth.

    Pan only partly succeeded in turning himself from a goat into a fish. Ancient autumnal equinox location.

    Capricornus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

     

    Star Clusters:  M30 (Globular cluster), mag. 7.7.

     

  • Cyg - Cygnus the Swan

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    16 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Find the bowl of the big dipper and locate the two stars nearest the handle. A line running through these stars, tracing away from it above the open bowl. This line runs to Deneb, the tail of the constellation Cygnus the Swan. With wings abreast, and long neck outstretched, Cygnus flies along the milky river.

    Cygnus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

     

  • Del - Delphinus the Dolphin

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    69 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Located between Pegasus and Aquila, look for four stars in a diamond (also called Job’s Coffin).

    Delphinus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

    Delphinus rescued Arion, a singer, after pirates threw him overboard. After Arion rode the dolphin to shore, the pirates were captured and executed.

  • Equ - Equuleus the Foal

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    87 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Adjacent to Pegasus toward Aquila, one of the smallest of the 88 constellations.

    Equuleus is included in the ancient star catalog of Ptolemy, but not in those of Eudoxos of Knidos and Aratos of Soli.

    Foal of Pegasus, or seahorse.

  • Gru - Grus the Crane

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    45 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Partially visible low in the south in August and September from 35 degrees north latitude. Grus is one of four birds in the southern skies (cf. Pavo the Peacock, Phoenix, and Tucana the Toucan). It contains many very faint galaxies.

    One of the eleven southern constellations created by Pieter Dirksz Keyser and Frederick de Houtman in 1596. These were published in Plate Aaa of Johann Bayer, Uranographia (1603).

  • Her - Hercules the Hero

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    5 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Located between Ophiuchus and Draco. Look for the Keystone, a trapezoid of four stars.

    Hercules is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

    Legendary hero who performed dozens of labors.

     

    Asterisms

    Keystone

     

    Star Clusters

    M13, Great Cluster (Globular cluster), mag. 5.9.
    M92 (Globular cluster), mag. 6.4.

     

    Galaxies

    M13, bright globular cluster.

     

     

     

     

     

  • Ind - Indus the American Indian

    Size

    49 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Very dim.

    One of the eleven southern constellations created by Pieter Dirksz Keyser and Frederick de Houtman in 1596. These were published in Plate Aaa of Johann Bayer, Uranographia (1603).

    Special Stars

    Epsilon-Indi is a very close red dwarf, and therefore the faintest star visible to the unaided eye. 11.3 LY.