September

  • Cap - Capricornus the Sea Goat

    Size

    40 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Between Sagittarius and Aquarius. Dim stars; look for laughing mouth.

    Pan only partly succeeded in turning himself from a goat into a fish. Ancient autumnal equinox location.

    Capricornus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

     

    Star Clusters:  M30 (Globular cluster), mag. 7.7.

     

  • Cep - Cepheus the King of Ethiopia

    Size

    27 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Another circumpolar constellation is the Ethiopian king, Cepheus (SEE-fee-us). He sits atop the Milky Way on a throne near his queen Cassiopeia. The legs and seat of his throne make a rough square. On the Ursa Major side of Cassiopeia, looks like a house (or throne) sitting on the Milky Way. Look for mu-Cephei, the "garnet star," with a deep reddish tint. The back of the seat comes to a point at the top above his head.

    Cepheus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

     

  • Cyg - Cygnus the Swan

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    16 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Find the bowl of the big dipper and locate the two stars nearest the handle. A line running through these stars, tracing away from it above the open bowl. This line runs to Deneb, the tail of the constellation Cygnus the Swan. With wings abreast, and long neck outstretched, Cygnus flies along the milky river.

    Cygnus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

     

  • Del - Delphinus the Dolphin

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    69 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Located between Pegasus and Aquila, look for four stars in a diamond (also called Job’s Coffin).

    Delphinus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

    Delphinus rescued Arion, a singer, after pirates threw him overboard. After Arion rode the dolphin to shore, the pirates were captured and executed.

  • Equ - Equuleus the Foal

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    87 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Adjacent to Pegasus toward Aquila, one of the smallest of the 88 constellations.

    Equuleus is included in the ancient star catalog of Ptolemy, but not in those of Eudoxos of Knidos and Aratos of Soli.

    Foal of Pegasus, or seahorse.

  • Ind - Indus the American Indian

    Size

    49 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Very dim.

    One of the eleven southern constellations created by Pieter Dirksz Keyser and Frederick de Houtman in 1596. These were published in Plate Aaa of Johann Bayer, Uranographia (1603).

    Special Stars

    Epsilon-Indi is a very close red dwarf, and therefore the faintest star visible to the unaided eye. 11.3 LY.

     

  • Oct - Octans the Octant

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    50 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Octans the Octant is devoid of bright stars, but three faint stars (not numbered by brightness) make a small triangle.

    The south celestial pole actually lies within Octans. No RA (visible anytime).  

    The nearest easy-to-spot star to the south pole is Beta-Hydri in Hydrus the Little Snake. No brighter star than Achernar (alpha-Eridani) is closer to the south celestial pole, which lies midway between Achernar (Eridanus) and Crux.

    One of 17 constellations created by Nicolas Louis de Lacaille in 1756.

     

    Special Stars

  • Pav - Pavo the Peacock

    IAU Constellation

    Size

    44 of 88

    Intro and Visual description

    Pavo the Peacock is one of four birds in the southern skies (cf. Grus the Crane, Phoenix, and Tucana the Toucan). Argos, who built the ship Argo Navis, was changed into a peacock by Juno.

    One of the eleven southern constellations created by Pieter Dirksz Keyser and Frederick de Houtman in 1596. These were published in Plate Aaa of Johann Bayer, Uranographia (1603).

    Special Stars:  Alpha-Pavonis, known to navigators as the Peacock star. Magnitude 1.9. 230 LY. 700 times brighter than the Sun.

  • Peg - Pegasus the Flying Horse

    Size

    7 of 88

    Regions

    Intro and Visual description

    Farther along on the line from the Pointers to Polaris and Cassiopeia is a large, nearly perfect square of four stars. This is the Great Square of Pegasus. Pegasus, the Winged Horse, lies almost directly overhead in autumn. Located east of Andromeda; signals the coming of Fall. Because Pegasus flies so fast, his hind quarters can’t be seen.

    Pegasus is included in the ancient star catalogs of Eudoxos of Knidos, Aratos of Soli, and Ptolemy.

     

     

    Skylore and Literature:  See Andromeda and Perseus.